Apps, Apps for Learning, iPad, iPadEd

Getting Started with Pic Collage

Why?

When we are working with schools an app that staff always seem to enjoy and to get a lot of value from is Pic Collage. For us, Pic Collage falls into the category of apps that are simple to us and can be used in a variety of creative ways, and what’s more it’s available for free… if you’re willing to have watermarking through your image and be limited with colour schemes and stickers.

How could it be used?

We have seen Pic Collage used in a number of creative ways such as:

  • A mind map demonstrating learning from a topic or unit of work.
  • A Collage celebrating a school trip or experience day.
  • Teachers could create displays for a working wall.
  • Documenting a science experiment.
  • Evidence of concrete/ apparatus based learning which could added to class books or even better a class portfolio such as Seesaw or Showbie.
  • Showing the development of project in Art and Design.
  • Celebrating a special day in your class or school.
  • Creating posters for after school clubs.
  • Adding stickers and emojis over the faces of children who may not have permission to be shared on social media.
  • Pic Collage allows you to manipulate images and the orientation of images, this means you can use the app as an editor.

Finally, it may seem obvious but Pic Collage is brilliant at combining picture from various apps that may not normally work together, more can be found on this here: https://geekyteacher.blog/2018/11/14/armistice-app-smash/

We hope this helps you to think about how you could use Pic Collage in your school, how have you used Pic Collage? We would love to hear and add it to the list to help other teachers. Which idea do you think you might use in your school now?

Thanks for Reading!

Adam, Casey, Cherise and Sim

The EdTech Hub Team

Computational Thinking, Computing, iPad, iPadEd, Keynote

Computational Thinking with Keynote

EdTech Hub team member, Adam Chase, has written an Article about using Keynote to create engaging Cinegraphics which are fun to make in class and simple to make too. This covers Computational Thinking, which is an area of the Computing Curriculum, as the Programme of Study shows:

Computing Curriculum Purpose of study

  • A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world.
  • The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming.

One of the areas of Computational Thinking is Abstraction, and this is a simple and cheap way of doing this for schools and I have found it with Keynote.

What is it?

Through the process of abstraction, a programmer hides all but the relevant data about an object in order to reduce complexity and increase efficiency (Margaret Rouse, Tech Target, 2018).

Why?

This is a nice, simple activity to teach part of Computing Curriculum, children’s understanding of computational thinking and how I.T works is believed to be the most under taught part of the computing curriculum and this can be helped by enjoyable and engaging activities like this.

How

Keynote has the ability to add icons directly in the app, no app smashing required, don’t get me wrong I love app smashing but it does help to keep things simple. Adam has made a full video on how he made a Film plot picture (Cinegraphic). He chose to make his from a small portion of Harry Potter, when Voldemort visits the Potters at Godric’s Hollow. Please note this is a very comprehensive video:

Cinegraphics are very interesting to make and the good thing is this activity would work from EYFS to KS4, just adapt the film/book and add complexity to the graphic.

Thanks for Reading,

EdTech Hub Team